Effects of Human Sexuality Education on Self- Protection Competence of Sexually Abused Senior Secondary Students in Edo State, Nigeria

Author: Ogedengbe, Oshiomah Rosemary

Supervisors: Ubangha M. B. and Makinde B. O.

Many underage persons repeatedly suffer avoidable sexual abuse, due to their lack of self-protection competence which is caused by inadequate knowledge of adolescent reproductive health and lack of assertiveness, especially in sexually threatening situations. Sexual abuse has grave consequences on the victim, the family and the society. This study examined the effects of Human Sexuality Education (HSE), vis-à-vis Adolescent Reproductive Health Education (ARHE) and Assertiveness Training (AT) on self-protection Competence of sexually abused secondary school students in Edo State. Quasi experimental pre and post-tests control group design was employed. The population comprised all SSII students in public co-educational secondary schools in Edo State. Multistage process was used to select a sample of 104 SSII students from the population. The study was guided by six research hypotheses. Assertiveness Scale for Adolescents (ASA), Knowledge of Adolescent Reproductive Health Questionnaire (KARHQ), Sexual Assertiveness Questionnaire (SAQ) and Parent Child Attachment Questionnaire (PCAQ) were the four instruments used for the baseline assessment while only Assertiveness Scale for Adolescents (ASA), Knowledge of Adolescent Reproductive Health Questionnaire (KARHQ) and Sexual Assertiveness Questionnaire (SAQ) were also used for the post intervention assessment. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was used to test the hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. The results revealed that both ARHE and AT were effective in enhancing the participants’ knowledge of adolescent reproductive health and consequently their self-protection competence against sexual abuse. The results also showed that both ARHE and AT were effective in improving their assertiveness though AT was more effective. The results demonstrated that both ARHE and AT were equally effective in enhancing the participants’ assertiveness in sexually threatening situations. The results showed no significant gender difference in participants’ knowledge of adolescent reproductive health and assertiveness. It also revealed no significant difference in students’ knowledge of adolescent reproductive health due to parental attachment. Based on these findings, it was recommended that school counsellors should regularly expose students to Human Sexuality Education through Adolescent Reproductive Health Education and Assertiveness Training in order to enhance their self-protection competence against sexual abuse and that such AT should focus on sexually threatening situations.